In order to allow for the installation of scaffolding and floor, statuary, and artwork protection in conjunction with the Dome Restoration Project, the Rotunda of the Capitol will be closed from Monday, July 27 through Monday, September 7. While the Rotunda is unavailable for tours, an alternate tour route will be provided. The Capitol Visitor Center is open during the closure of the Rotunda and will offer special activities which do not require advance reservations. You can also download our new U.S. Capitol Rotunda app.

Reforming the House, Shifting Power, 1970s

The shocks and turmoil of the Vietnam War and Watergate scandal brought major government reforms. These changes forged much of the character that defines the House today.

Demands for greater openness in government meant fewer closed committee meetings. The House installed electronic voting systems in 1973, and in 1979 began televising its debates. Committees continued to do important work behind the scenes, but the televised proceedings became increasingly important.

The House also began choosing committee chairs through party caucuses rather than by seniority. This too shifted more power to party leaders and individual members, and away from committee leaders. These and other changes have helped the House to enter the 21st century a more open and responsive instrument of representative democracy.

They wanted to change the Congress of the United States; which they did.”
— Speaker “Tip” O’Neill on the new representatives he called “Watergate Babies"

History of Congress and the Capitol

The House 1945-Present

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Television cameras in an Energy...
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Television cameras in an Energy Committee meeting, September 3, 2003

During the 1970s, the move toward “sunshine in government” brought changes in House rules. Most committee proceedings were opened to the public and the media.

AP/Wide World Photos

Television cameras in an Energy Committee meeting, September 3, 2003

During the 1970s, the move toward “sunshine in government” brought changes in House rules. Most committee proceedings were opened to the public and the media.

AP/Wide World Photos

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