The Medal of Honor

The Medal of Honor is the highest award for military bravery bestowed upon individuals in this country and is presented “in the name of the Congress of the United States.” It is awarded for a deed of personal bravery or self-sacrifice above and beyond the call of duty while an individual is a member of the armed services.

Since its inception in 1861, during the time of the Civil War, more than 3,400 individuals have received the Medal of Honor. It has been awarded to members of each of the five services: Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. Twenty-one of its recipients later became members of Congress.

 

House of Representatives Senate
Henry H. Bingham, Pennsylvania–Civil War
John C. Black, Illinois–Civil War
Thomas W. Bradley, New York–Civil War
Amos J. Cummings, New York–Civil War
Newton M. Curtis, New York–Civil War
Byron M. Cutcheon, Michigan–Civil War
John M. Farquhar, New York–Civil War
John H. Moffitt, New York–Civil War
Charles E. Phelps, Maryland–Civil War
Philip S. Post, Illinois–Civil War
Daniel E. Sickles, New York–Civil War
Richmond P. Hobson, Alabama–Spanish-American War
Willis W. Bradley, California–World War I
Edouard V. Izac, California–World War I

Adelbert Ames, Mississippi–Civil War
Henry A. DuPont, Delaware–Civil War
Matthew S. Quay, Pennsylvania–Civil War
William J. Sewell, New Jersey–Civil War
Francis E. Warren, Wyoming–Civil War
Daniel K. Inouye, Hawaii–World War II
Joseph R. (Bob) Kerrey, Nebraska–Vietnam War

 

History of Congress and the Capitol

Images of the Era 1913-1945

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Medal of Honor for the U.S. Army
Image Caption

Medal of Honor for the U.S. Army

Authorized by an Act of Congress and approved by President Abraham Lincoln in July 1862.

A five-pointed star rests on a green laurel wreath. Inside the star is the head of Minerva, the goddess of wisdom and righteous war. It is surmounted by a bar inscribed "Valor" and an eagle clutching the arrows of war and the olive branch of peace. The 13 stars on the ribbon represent the original 13 colonies. The recipient's name is inscribed on the reverse.

Department of the Army

Medal of Honor for the U.S. Army

Authorized by an Act of Congress and approved by President Abraham Lincoln in July 1862.

A five-pointed star rests on a green laurel wreath. Inside the star is the head of Minerva, the goddess of wisdom and righteous war. It is surmounted by a bar inscribed "Valor" and an eagle clutching the arrows of war and the olive branch of peace. The 13 stars on the ribbon represent the original 13 colonies. The recipient's name is inscribed on the reverse.

Department of the Army

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