Due to a special event, on Wednesday, July 8, there will be no tours of the U.S. Capitol after 11 a.m. Emancipation Hall and Exhibition Hall in the Capitol Visitor Center will be unavailable all day. While reservations prior to 11 a.m. will be honored, same-day passes will not be available. The Capitol Visitor Center will close at noon except for individuals on official business and those going to the House and Senate Galleries.

Landscaping the Grounds

Like a painting in a frame, a grand building deserves a grand setting. The Capitol grounds had suffered as a construction site while the wings and dome were built. They were also too small for the enlarged building. Senator Justin Morrill of Vermont spearheaded efforts to improve them, calling in Frederick Law Olmsted, father of American landscape architecture (best known for New York City's Central Park).

In 1873, Congress agreed to close sections of A Street north and south and bought two adjacent squares of land, bringing the Capitol grounds to 58 acres. Olmsted designed a marble terrace for the west front, arguing that the building looked as if it might otherwise slide off Jenkins Hill. The terrace, built between 1882 and 1892, also provided committee and storage space.

History of Congress and the Capitol

The Capitol 1877-1913

Next Image Next Image Previous Image Previous Image
The Summerhouse
Image Caption

The Summerhouse

Olmsted's picturesque retreat provided a cool resting place for visitors to the Capitol grounds.

Architect of the Capitol

The Summerhouse

Olmsted's picturesque retreat provided a cool resting place for visitors to the Capitol grounds.

Architect of the Capitol

Pages