In order to allow for the installation of scaffolding and floor, statuary, and artwork protection in conjunction with the Dome Restoration Project, the Rotunda of the Capitol will be closed from Monday, July 27 through Monday, September 7. While the Rotunda is unavailable for tours, an alternate tour route will be provided. The Capitol Visitor Center is open during the closure of the Rotunda and will offer special activities which do not require advance reservations. You can also download our new U.S. Capitol Rotunda app.

The Hundred Days March – June 1933

The crisis of the Great Depression demanded action. During his 1932 presidential campaign, Franklin D. Roosevelt advised: “Take a method and try it. If it fails . . . try another. But above all, try something.” When Congress convened on March 9, 1933, it joined President Roosevelt in a flurry of legislation to restore America’s confidence and prosperity.

On the first day, Congress passed, and the president signed, emergency banking relief. In the weeks ahead, senators and representatives approved bills creating public-works jobs, insuring bank deposits, refinancing home and farm mortgages, reorganizing railroads, stabilizing prices and wages, establishing power plants and flood control projects, and helping farmers sell surplus crops. The session lasted 100 days—a creative burst of energy that initiated economic recovery and established a more activist role for the federal government.

"Take a method and try it. If it fails ... try another. But above all, try something."
— President Franklin D. Roosevelt, May 22, 1932

History of Congress and the Capitol

The Senate 1913-1945

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Work with Care, by Nathan Sherman...
Image Caption

Work with Care, by Nathan Sherman, 1936

Workplace safety posters sponsored by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) were an example of federal support for the arts.

Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

Work with Care, by Nathan Sherman, 1936

Workplace safety posters sponsored by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) were an example of federal support for the arts.

Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

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