In order to allow for the installation of scaffolding and floor, statuary, and artwork protection in conjunction with the Dome Restoration Project, the Rotunda of the Capitol will be closed from Monday, July 27 through Monday, September 7. While the Rotunda is unavailable for tours, an alternate tour route will be provided. The Capitol Visitor Center is open during the closure of the Rotunda and will offer special activities which do not require advance reservations. You can also download our new U.S. Capitol Rotunda app.

The House Limits its Number

Every decade, the Census determines the size of each state’s House delegation. Before 1913 (when membership reached 435), total House membership expanded steadily as the population grew—with some states getting more members while others kept the same number even if their population decreased. The chamber became increasingly crowded, forcing members to abandon individual desks on the floor in favor of compact theater-style seating.

The 1920 Census raised a new dilemma. More than half the population now lived in cities and towns. Rural states fought suggestions to shrink their delegations. Other members, meanwhile, resisted enlarging the already packed House. Congress broke the stalemate before the 1930 Census by deciding to keep the number at 435, with individual states gaining and losing seats after each Census.

History of Congress and the Capitol

The House 1913-1945

Next Image Next Image Previous Image Previous Image
Map showing states that gained and...
Image Caption

Map showing states that gained and lost representatives due to reapportionment in the 1930 census.

Map showing states that gained and lost representatives due to reapportionment in the 1930 census.

Map showing states that gained and lost representatives due to reapportionment in the 1930 census.

Map showing states that gained and lost representatives due to reapportionment in the 1930 census.