In order to allow for the installation of scaffolding and floor, statuary, and artwork protection in conjunction with the Dome Restoration Project, the Rotunda of the Capitol will be closed from Monday, July 27 through Monday, September 7. While the Rotunda is unavailable for tours, an alternate tour route will be provided. The Capitol Visitor Center is open during the closure of the Rotunda and will offer special activities which do not require advance reservations. You can also download our new U.S. Capitol Rotunda app.

A Capitol Growth Spurt

Across America, the 1930s was the era of the Great Depression. On Capitol Hill, it was a decade of rapid expansion. While the Capitol itself remained largely unchanged, the surrounding campus was transformed. Six major building projects greatly expanded Capitol Hill’s facilities.

The construction reflected the growing role and size of the federal government. Projects included: the Supreme Court Building (1929-1935); Longworth House Office Building (1929-1933); Rare Book Room Addition for the Library of Congress’s Thomas Jefferson Building (1929-1933); First Street Addition to the Russell Senate Office Building (1931-1933); New Botanic Garden Conservatory (1932-1933); and the John Adams Building for the Library of Congress (1933-1938).

History of Congress and the Capitol

The Capitol 1913-1945

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Construction of the Rare Book Room...
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Construction of the Rare Book Room addition, Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building, ca. 1931.Construction of the Rare Book Room addition, Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building, ca. 1931.

Construction of the Rare Book Room addition, Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building, ca. 1931.

Architect of the Capitol

Construction of the Rare Book Room addition, Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building, ca. 1931.Construction of the Rare Book Room addition, Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building, ca. 1931.

Construction of the Rare Book Room addition, Library of Congress, Thomas Jefferson Building, ca. 1931.

Architect of the Capitol

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