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"Women in Charge," Outlook Magazine, American Association of University Women, vol, 96, no, 1 (Spring-Summer 2002)

Patsy Mink (center), the first Asian-American woman elected to Congress, overcame both racial and sexual discrimination in her education and career. Her Title IX legislation ensured younger generations of women access, equal with men, to academic and athletic training. Upon her death in 2002, Congress renamed Title IX the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act.

Manuscript Division, Library of Congress

"Women in Charge," Outlook Magazine, American Association of University Women, vol, 96, no, 1 (Spring-Summer 2002)

Title IX

In 1972 Congress passed Title IX—landmark civil rights legislation that prohibited sex discrimination in any program or activity of federally funded educational institutions. Representative Patsy Mink of Hawaii, who coauthored the bill with Representative Edith Green of Oregon, was its strongest proponent. Title IX expanded academic opportunities for women, including admission to medical and law schools. It also had a big impact on equity in athletics. Within 25 years, the number of young women participating in interscholastic sports increased 800 percent.