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Telegram from the mayor of Baltimore in favor of officially recognizing “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the National Anthem, January 1, 1930

In 1930, when the House Judiciary Committee held hearings on the bill introduced by Representative John Linthicum of Maryland to make “The Star-Spangled Banner” the national anthem, the mayor of Baltimore telegraphed his support. Letters and telegrams from 25 governors and petitions signed by more than five million citizens urged Congress to approve the bill.

Excerpt:

The anthem written under such stirring circumstances as the bombardment of Fort McHenry has been the inspiration of our fighting forces and civilians ever since its inception.

Records of the U.S. House of Representatives, National Archives and Records Administration

Telegram from the mayor of Baltimore in favor of officially recognizing “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the National Anthem, January 1, 1930 Telegram from the mayor of Baltimore in favor of officially recognizing “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the National Anthem, January 1, 1930 (with excerpt highlighted)

The National Anthem

“The Star-Spangled Banner,” a song based on a poem by Francis Scott Key, was inspired by the American flag during the War of 1812. It became the United States’ national anthem through the efforts of Representative John Linthicum of Maryland. Linthicum introduced his bill in the House of Representatives in 1929. Bolstered by petitions, letters, and telegrams from around the country, he pressed for its passage, saying that an anthem would be an expression of patriotism. In 1931 Congress officially designated the song as the national anthem.

O say does that star spangled banner yet wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

“Star-Spangled Banner,” National Anthem of the United States