Menu
Image 1 of
Zoom In
Zoom Out
Fullscreen

Telegram to the Chairman, G.I. Bill Committee, May 20, 1944

In this telegram, a solider expressed his dissatisfaction with an age cap for G.I. Bill education benefits. During hearings on the bill, some congressmen thought only veterans under 25 should be eligible for benefits; others thought all veterans should be eligible. In its final form the bill provided education and training benefits for veterans who enlisted or were drafted before the age of 25.

Records of the U.S. Senate, National Archives and Records Administration

I WANT TO PROTEST AGAINST THE AGE LIMITATION IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROVISION AT THE GI BILL. I AND MY BUDDIES THINK THIS IS EXTREMELY UNFAIR[.] WHY SHOULD WE FELLOWS WHO WERE A YEAR OR TWO OLDER WHEN DRAFTED OR ENLISTED BE PENALIZED

Telegram to the Chairman, G.I. Bill Committee, May 20, 1944 Telegram to the Chairman, G.I. Bill Committee, May 20, 1944

The G.I. Bill of Rights

After its unanimous approval by the House and Senate, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the G.I. Bill of Rights into law on June 22, 1944. The act provided returning soldiers with 52 weeks of unemployment insurance; money for post-secondary education and job training; and government-backed, low-interest mortgages and loans in order to ease their transition into civilian life. By 1951 nearly 8 million veterans had received educational and training benefits, and 2.4 million had received loans for homes, farms, and businesses. Subsequent bills passed in 1952, 1966, 1985, and 2008, which extended benefits to millions of veterans of subsequent military engagements.

This measure has for its purpose extending full justice and educational opportunities to the veterans of this war who have defended the Republic with their life and blood.

Representative Karl M. Le Compte of Iowa, Speech to the U.S. House of Representatives, May 12, 1944