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Signature Pages for the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of America, Charter of the United Nations, June 26, 1945

Fifty nations signed the United Nations Charter in San Francisco in June 1945. The right-hand page shows the signatures of the U.S. delegates, including the four members of Congress. A successor to the League of Nations, the United Nations was founded to create and maintain world peace and security and promote international cooperation on economic, social, and humanitarian issues.

General Records of the U.S. Government, National Archives and Records Administration

Signature Pages for the Charter of the United Nations - Image 1 Signature Pages for the Charter of the United Nations - Image 2 Signature Pages for the Charter of the United Nations - Image 3

The United Nations Charter

As World War II reached its climax, representatives from 50 nations met in San Francisco, California, from April to June 1945 to discuss the coming postwar world. The eight-person U.S. delegation to the conference, appointed by President Harry S. Truman, included a bipartisan group of two senators and two representatives from Congress. These delegates played key roles in shaping the United Nations Charter, both before and during the conference, and subsequently guided it to overwhelming approval in the Senate.

I regard the United Nations Charter as the most important document ever struck off by the hands of men.

Senator John H. Bankhead of Alabama, Telegram to Senator Tom Connally of Texas, July 16, 1945