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S. 1767, A Bill to provide Federal Government aid for the readjustment in civilian life of returning World War II veterans (G.I. Bill of Rights), March 13, 1944

Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 22, 1944, the G.I. Bill provided millions of World War II veterans with funds for college and vocational education and loans for homes, farms, and businesses. Congress passed bills in 1984 and 2008 to ensure similar benefits for today’s veterans.

 

Records of the U.S. Senate, National Archives and Records Administration

S. 1767, A Bill to provide Federal Government aid for the readjustment in civilian life of returning World War II veterans (G.I. Bill of Rights), March 13, 1944

The G.I. Bill of Rights

The Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, known better as the G.I. Bill of Rights, guaranteed World War II veterans funds for college education and vocational training, unemployment insurance and home loans. Along with successor legislation extending benefits to veterans of other wars, it is considered one of the furthest-reaching acts of Congress in the twentieth century.

Just as the free public-school system has been a tremendous force for democracy, this provision for the education of millions of men and women releases unlimited resources in our young people.

Senator Robert F. Wagner’s Speech to the Senate, June 23, 1944