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Projet of a Treaty of Peace (Treaty of Ghent), November 10, 1814

A working draft of the Treaty of Ghent records British changes to the American proposal, including terms for the return of prisoners of war. Though it didn’t address all the causes of the conflict, the Treaty of Ghent initiated a lasting peace between the United States and Great Britain.

His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America, desirous of terminating the War which has unhappily subsisted between the two Countries, and of restoring, upon principles of perfect reciprocity, Peace, Friendship and Good Understanding between them have, for that purpose appointed their respective Plenipotentiaries,…who,…have agreed upon the following Articles.

Records of the U.S. Senate, National Archives and Records Administration

Projet of a Treaty of Peace (Treaty of Ghent), November 10, 1814 Projet of a Treaty of Peace (Treaty of Ghent), November 10, 1814 His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America, desirous of terminating the War which has unhappily subsisted between the two Countries, and of restoring, upon principles of perfect reciprocity, Peace, Friendship and Good Understanding between them have, for that purpose appointed their respective Plenipotentiaries,…who,…have agreed upon the following Articles.

War of 1812: The Treaty of Ghent

The Treaty of Ghent ended the War of 1812. Signed in Ghent, Belgium, on Christmas Eve, 1814, it was approved by the British Parliament on December 30; the United States Senate approved it for ratification on February 16, 1815. Though the war had no clear winner, the treaty restored pre-war territorial boundaries, returned prisoners, and strengthened the United States as a nation. The greatest loss was to American Indians: without the support of their British allies, they were left vulnerable to U.S. power and expansionism.