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Platt Amendment, February 27, 1901

Senator Orville Platt of Connecticut introduced an amendment to an Army appropriation bill that set terms for ending the U.S. occupation of Cuba. It forced Cuba to allow the United States to intervene in its affairs and operate naval bases there. Although Congress repealed the Platt Amendment in 1934, the United States still maintains a base in Guantanamo, Cuba.

Records of the U.S. House of Representatives, National Archives and Records Administration

Excerpt:
That the government of Cuba consents that the United States may exercise the right to intervene for the preservation of Cuban independence, the maintenance of a government adequate for the protection of life, property, and individual liberty

Platt Amendment, February 27, 1901 Platt Amendment, February 27, 1901 Platt Amendment, February 27, 1901 - Excerpt

Cuba and the Platt Amendment

Congress declared war against Spain in 1898 to support Cuba’s independence, vowing to respect Cuban sovereignty. After the war, however, the United States maintained military control of Cuba. Secretary of War Elihu Root set conditions for ending the occupation, and Senator Orville Platt of Connecticut introduced them in Congress as a legislative amendment. Among other stipulations, the Platt Amendment permitted U.S. intervention in Cuban affairs. Under pressure from the United States, Cuba incorporated the Platt Amendment into its new constitution until the terms were repealed in 1934.