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"Celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Title IX!" Dear Colleague Letter, ca. June 23, 1997

By the 25th anniversary of Title IX, its effects were evident. Medical and professional schools produced more female graduates, and a new generation of women participated and excelled in college sports. Women’s advanced athleticism led to the founding of female professional sports leagues and greater achievements for the U.S. in the Olympics.

Title IX…has improved graduation rates among girls and young women at the secondary and post-secondary level, opened the doors of our colleges, graduate and professional schools, increased opportunities for women in non-traditional fields of study… and helped to fight sexual harassment in our schools.

Manuscript Division, Library of Congress

"Celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Title IX!" Dear Colleague Letter, ca. June 23, 1997 Title IX…has improved graduation rates among girls and young women at the secondary and post-secondary level, opened the doors of our colleges, graduate and professional schools, increased opportunities for women in non-traditional fields of study… and helped to fight sexual harassment in our schools.

Title IX

In 1972 Congress passed Title IX—landmark civil rights legislation that prohibited sex discrimination in any program or activity of federally funded educational institutions. Representative Patsy Mink of Hawaii, who coauthored the bill with Representative Edith Green of Oregon, was its strongest proponent. Title IX expanded academic opportunities for women, including admission to medical and law schools. It also had a big impact on equity in athletics. Within 25 years, the number of young women participating in interscholastic sports increased 800 percent.