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Books borrowed from the Library of Congress by Senators Daniel Clark and Henry Wilson

Harriet Beecher Stowe. Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life among the Lowly (1853 edition)

John Bunyan. The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come. (1808 edition)

These volumes represent some of the titles that Senators Clark and Wilson borrowed from the Library of Congress. Clark chose Homer’s ancient Greek epic The Odyssey and the 17th-century Christian allegory Pilgrim’s Progress. Wilson’s reading included the best-selling antislavery novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, first published in 1852.

Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress

Harriet Beecher Stowe. Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life among the Lowly (1853 edition) John Bunyan. The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come. (1808 edition) Homer. The Odyssey.

A Library for Congress

Thomas Jefferson believed "there is ... no subject to which a member of Congress may not have occasion to refer," and his broad approach to book collecting shaped the holdings of the Library of Congress. The library was created for members of Congress as a resource for their work—by extension becoming the nation's library and the world's largest repository of knowledge. In addition to politics, history, and law, its holdings encompass philosophy, poetry, classical literature, art, the natural sciences, and popular fiction.