Lying in State of Congressman Elijah E. Cummings

The public is invited to pay their respects to Representative Elijah E. Cummings Thursday, October 24 from 1 p.m. until 7 p.m. Please enter through the Capitol Visitor Center.

On Thursday, October 24, the Capitol Visitor Center will be closed for normal operations, and all Capitol tours are cancelled.

On Wednesday, October 23, the second floor of the Capitol will be closed to the public. The Capitol Visitor Center will offer modified tours of the Capitol.

If you have a tour reservation and would like to reschedule, please click here or contact the Visitor Services Office at (202)226-8000.

On Friday, October 25, the Capitol Visitor Center will reopen for normal operations and Capitol tours at 8:30 a.m.

Congress and the Judicial Branch: Negotiation

Twelve-year-old Girl in Vermont Cotton Mill, photograph by Lewis Hine, 1910

Congress and the federal courts have unique but complementary powers as defined by the Constitution.

Congress creates laws; the Supreme Court interprets those laws in the context of legal disputes and rules on their constitutionality. Congress can change the courts’ size, structure, and jurisdiction. The two branches have sometimes disagreed on issues, each questioning the actions of the other, but have also found common ground, building on and reinforcing each other’s work. This constitutional dialogue between those who write our laws and those who interpret them is central to the U.S. system of checks and balances.